Marks and Remarks
Food for the Mind and Eye

No. 0022, February 13, 2015


DEPT. OF PHILOSOPHY OF PHOTOGRAPHY


The Camera and I



Copyright 2015 by S. W. Paul Wyszkowski

      The above image, entitled "A Futility of Nails", is fairly typical of one category of pictures I take which could be labelled "Rot and Decay". More specifically, these are records of man's efforts to re-order the world to suit his/her ideas of what the world order should be being defeated by nature's patient effort to reclaim man's works and return them to a state of natural balance of chaos and order. Which, aesthetically, is often an improvement.

      Actually, nature is a Darwinian battlefield on which conflicts and adaptations often spontaneously lead to new structures of surprising beauty. They don't last - some endure for aeons, others are transformed in a blink of an eye. Photography is a means of calling attention to those instances of beauty and extending, even intensifying the opportunity to appreciate them from selected points of view.

      Homo sapiens is the most marvelous product of the evolutionary process and the works of man (and/or woman) raise conflicts and adaptations to new, unprecedented levels. Yet people rarely appear in my photographs. That is because observing and recording people in action is an extraordinarily difficult task. It requires establishing a special, intimate relationship with persons to be photographed (unless they are acting in the role of a public figure which is rarely their fully dimensional true self). Establishing such relationships is not my forte. An occasional portrait of a willing subject is about all I can manage in way of people photography. Sometimes strangers in public places provide an opportunity to observe humans anonymously.

      I do photograph the works of mankind as objects of wonder and beauty. And there is one other kind of image I seek out wherever I am: abstract patterns to be presented as such, as found Art, or for use as raw materials for constructing completely new images.

      "Sounds like you have your photographic work cut out for you," notes Prickles. Yes, now to find time and energy to carry on with it. "Better keep up your gym routine," Prickles advises.



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